Anytime salads: frisee aux lardons salad with poached eggs and Gorgonzola)

Frisee Aux Lardons avec Ouefs Pochés et Gorgonzola/Frisee Aux Lardons with Poached Eggs and Gorgonzola

Frisee Aux Lardons with Poached Eggs and Gorgonzola

Another day, and more eggs. Only this time they are in a salad, and they are far more pleasing to look at because I took this photo last June when we were enjoying the height of natural light. (Oh natural light, how I miss you.)

But of course, this proves the eternal truth that just because a salad is called such a thing, there is no guarantee that it’s going to be rabbit food, given that friseé is one of those greens that isn’t the most nutritionally dense (at least compared to the ubiquitous kale) and it’s basically coddling a wonderful combination of Gorgonzola, bacon bits, and poached eggs–nary a spa food in the lot save for the greens. But that’s kind of what makes it wonderful: it strikes the right balance between heavy and light that leaves you satisfied without feeling like you have a gut full of food, and it’s also a one-course meal that can come together relatively quickly if your multitasking skills are in peak condition. (Mine vary by how tired I am when I get home from work, but I can still pull this together in about 20 minutes.)

Frisee Aux Lardons avec Ouefs Pochés et Gorgonzola/Frisee Aux Lardons with Poached Eggs and Gorgonzola

Frisee Aux Lardons avec Ouefs Pochés et Gorgonzola/Frisee Aux Lardons with Poached Eggs and Gorgonzola

 It comes adapted from the minds behind ‘wichcraft, who claim that any sandwich they make can be made into a salad. I’ve only converted two of the sandwiches from the cookbook into salads, but both have come out deliciously, so as of now I’m inclined to believe them.

We’re expecting another round of snow Sunday into Monday, and now I’m thinking that this salad might be in order this coming week in order to deal with this never-ending winter weather. Spring is twenty-odd days away, but I refuse to believe it until my feet are in sandals and espadrilles again.

Friseé aux Lardons Salad with Poached Eggs and Gorgonzola

serves 2 as a main and is adapted from wichcraft

  • 1/2 lb friseé, leaves separated and well-washed/dried
  • 1/2 lb bacon, cut into lardons
  • 1/4 lb Gorgonzola, broken into chunks
  • Red wine vinegar
  • Bacon fat (reserved from the bacon cooking)
  • a little olive oil
  • Kosher salt and pepper

Cook the bacon: in a small nonstick skillet, cook the bacon on low heat, rendering out as much fat as possible. Using a spider, remove the bacon and drain on paper towels and reserve cooking fat.

While the bacon is cooking, tear up the friseé and wash and dry thoroughly, then place in a bowl and toss with a tablespoon or two of good red wine vinegar; set aside. When the bacon is finished cooking, add a little of the reserved bacon fat to the friseé, toss well, then season with black pepper and just a bit of salt to taste (if needed).

Bring a small saucepan to a gentle boil simmer: add a splash of white vinegar, and then use a spoon or chopstick to create a whirlpool in the water. Crack an egg into a small bowl or ramekin, and gently dump the egg into the pan. Let cook for about 3 minutes, depending on the consistency you’re looking for in your egg yolks. As each egg finishes, gently remove with a spider and place in a bowl. Continue with the remaining eggs.

Divide the friseé among two plates, place the eggs on top, and then top with bacon and cheese. Serve immediately.

**I don’t know what I was talking about with the gentle boil–the simmer is the best thing here.

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9 comments
  1. Frisee salads with runny eggs and bacon just might be in my top 5 favorite foods. Best I ever had was at FIG in Charleston.

  2. Looks divine. All ingredients are faves of mine.

    What is a spider? I worked at Williams -Sonoma and that one is new to me. Maybe a regional name for something I already have?

    • Spider=skimmer. Usually spiders have wooden handles and wire nets, but WS has to be all fancy as theirs is all metal.. :)

      • and charge 3x as the spider… Thanks for clarification. I need a new one as mine just broke a couple weeks ago. Guess this recipe’s a good excuse to get one, eh?

  3. Brianne said:

    I’ve never had frisee. This is a damn fine way to be introduced.

  4. I have serious egg poaching jealousy — mine never come out looking that neat and delicate. You might actually be a sorcerer

    • I wish I had that kind of power, but unfortunately it just comes from much practice and many over-poached eggs. But that’s the good thing about them–a dozen isn’t prohibitively expensive (especially if you’re experimenting) and if one doesn’t turn out well, there are plenty more to use. Making the vortex/whirlpool and keeping things at a simmer have helped me, especially since my goofy stove is the least-reliable thing ever.

  5. shannon said:

    eggs on salads make me ridiculously happy, and i can see the summer light in that photo! ugh, i miss it too; it’s like every photo i take is going to be blueish right now, and i know that going in.
    i would totally believe that any good sandwich could be translated into a salad; and you just reminded me that i need to get that book as well. you’re terrible for my cookbook habit. :) and i HAVE that Williams Sonoma fancy spider! It is quite a bit more chic than my mom’s old spider (wire + wood handle), but it lasts forever, which is more than i can say for hers, at least from what i can remember. a solid kitchen utensil, though pricey.

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