Oysters and hot sausages. They pair surprisingly well together.

Despite the fact that the temperatures were barely cracking 40 degrees and snow was predicted to fall up in New England, there was no way I wasn’t going to let the first day of spring go by without marking it in some substantial way. I ended up flipping through my Canal House Cooking books, and landed on a couple of simple recipes that caught my eye: oysters with sausages and chilled avocado-cucumber soup. Michael suggested making cutlets or roasted chicken, and just like that we had a menu that felt properly celebratory.

I’ve sung the praises of the Canal House Cooking books previously, as their slow-fried chicken thighs are a favorite around here as is the ever-so-simple Italian Greyhound, and what I like about them is that they are incredibly unpretentious and you really feel like you’re hanging out in their riverside kitchen studio in Lambertville, New Jersey. Some of the recipes are more complicated than others, but what I love to do is discover little combinations that I otherwise would not have thought of going together, like oysters and sausages. Read More

Quasi-mushroom piadina with an Aperol spritz.

Years ago I found this recipe for piadina in an issue of Food and Wine magazine, and despite the presence of ricotta cheese I actually was able to convince Michael to make it fairly often. This was before I started making my own pizza dough so we’d use the stuff from the store, and then once I started making my own dough I think we became too preoccupied with making pizza to try making these again. Once we did use the ingredients on a full-fledged pizza, but I think it might have been too much ricotta for Michael to handle so we haven’t done it since. Read More

Cacio e pepe

Michael was in the UK for most of this past week, and so for the first time in a while I had a few days to myself to make whatever I wanted. Obviously, the first thing I did was buy a boatload of cheeses.

The next thing I did after running some errands on Sunday was to sequester myself in the kitchen to do all kinds of things: make a nice fancy brunch was first on the list and then I did some much-needed meal prep for the week. My friend D at The Kitchen Witch recently posted an intriguing recipe for a warm tomato vinaigrette, and I had bookmarked it thinking it would go really well with chicken thighs. I slow-roasted the tomatoes and whipped up a batch fairly easily, tripling the recipe she provided to use up all of the tomato passata that you make, and boy howdy is it tasty. I even made enough for Michael to have some for lunch when he got home from the airport because I’m nice like that. Read More

Escargots à la Bordelaise in the style of Galatoire’s

Back in November I did a very silly thing. I had this Amazon gift card that had been sitting on my desk for months, and for the life of me I couldn’t decide what to get with it. This was mainly due to the fact that I felt very uncomfortable about the circumstances in which it came to be in m possession, so I could never figure out what exactly should I get. I immediately dismissed all things practical because that’s no fun, and so I was toying with adding a couple of books to my cookbook collection or maybe getting a heavier kettlebell.

Instead, I ended up getting a used copy of Galatoire’s cookbook that was in very good condition and a cast iron snail pan.

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Marinated chicken thighs in the style of Craft.

About a week ago I found a link to an article on the myth of easy cooking–in it the author claims that cooking for the most part isn’t very easy or fast, and with so many ways of ordering food made available to us, sometimes it’s simply much, much faster to get some relatively-wholesome food via Seamless or similar. On one hand, she’s right because if you did take her approach and stop at the market every day for ingredients and then set down to cook them when you got home from work, it would take an enormous amount of time. Read More

Grilled Oysters with Horseradish Aioli and Pancetta

As a lover of all things oyster, I have to admit that usually my preferred mode of eating them is raw and right out of the shell, maybe with a little lemon, horseradish, or mignonette. I’ll enjoy a good fried oyster po’ boy from time to time, of course, but I never really warmed to the idea of grilled oysters until we finally had Drago’s chargrilled oysters as part of an early evening happy hour on our last New Orleans trip. The concierge immediately directed us to the Drago’s that’s in the Hilton Riverside, and while the decor there screams that you’re eating in a hotel bar, the food is far better than what you’d get at a normal hotel. The original Drago’s is in Metarie so it’s not as easy to get to if you don’t have a car, so for many visitors the Hilton location is a good compromise. Read More

Palomas with Grapefruit Salt Air

It’s funny–when I was looking for restaurants to add to our New York itinerary, I largely relied on old favorites first but then took advantage of the time of year and started plumbing the best-of-2015 and 2016 eating guides. I didn’t get very far because Adam Platt’s Where to Eat 2016 gave me way too many places to even consider for a two-day stint, and so I populated my custom Google map accordingly.

Initially for Saturday brunch I wanted to go to Corkbuzz down by Union Square, since we also had plans to wander around the greenmarket in the morning for old time’s sake. Unfortunately they no longer do Saturday brunch so that was out the window, so instead I suggested a place from the brunch section of Where to Eat: Cosme. Platt describes it as “the ultimate in gourmet brunchtime pleasure” and the menu seemed pretty enticing so I was sold, and oh, what pleasure was in store for us. Read More

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